Gum disease, also known as periodontal disease, begins with the build-up of plaque – a sticky substance – on your teeth. That plaque feeds the growth of bacteria, which can lead to irritation and inflammation of your gums. Unfortunately, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that close to 50% of adults have gum disease to some degree

And, while it's true ... many people have heard about the link between gum disease and and heart problems - there’s a lot more to this story.  Sadly, there are way too many people walking around with gum disease and they have no idea about the dangers.

Gum disease is linked to several life-threatening health conditions

As you know, gum disease can cause uncomfortable symptoms like painful gums, bleeding gums, bad breath, pain when chewing and tooth sensitivity.  However, beyond oral discomfort, researchers have discovered that gum disease is associated with many other health problems.

In fact, many studies have found a link between heart disease and poor oral health, and researchers believe that it’s the inflammation of infected gums that may set off inflammation throughout the rest of the body - including the cardiovascular system.  Integrative healthcare providers often warn that these unwanted bacteria in the mouth can easily end up in the bloodstream - circulating to the heart and brain.

And, here's the thing, it's not only the bacteria that cause problems.  These toxic bacteria spit out some nasty waste products - which add to the toxin burden within the body. 

To keep your teeth and gums healthy, brush with Dentalcidin toothpaste and rinse with this oral care solution, found inside the NaturalHealth365 Store.  I, personally, use these products and I couldn't be happier with the results.

As stated before, there’s also a link between gum disease and cancer.  

Again, the inflammation that comes with gum disease affects your cancer risk, while other researchers believe that it's the spread of bacteria from the mouth that promotes the growth of cancer cells and tumors.  Either way, any stress on the immune system will make it harder for our body to detect (and destroy) cancer cells.

Gum disease and poor oral health have also been linked to a higher risk of cognitive decline as you grow older.  Keep this in mind (no pun intended), brain fog and memory loss could be caused by unaddressed infections and/or heavy metal toxicity. 

Bottom line: If you have bleeding gums or mercury-based, silver fillings in your mouth - be sure to correct these issues with a well-trained, biological dentist.

Essential tips for improving oral and overall health 

Now that you’re more aware of how dangerous gum disease can be to your overall health, what can you do about it?

Simply practicing better oral health habits can make a huge difference. Essential tips for improving your oral health include: 

  • Tip #1 – Regular Brushing: It's one of the most important things you can do to improve oral health and prevent gum disease. You should be brushing - 2 times per day - with a good quality toothpaste.
  • Tip #2 – Take Your Time When Brushing: Just giving your teeth a quick brush isn’t enough.  Dentists recommend that you brush for at least two minutes, brushing gently away from your gums. 
  • Tip #3 – Use a Quality Oral Care Solution: The fact is that microorganisms and bacterial biofilms can cause a number of oral health challenges.  Using broad-spectrum botanicals found inside Dentalcidin™ LS will assist in removing biofilms and plaque.  This will obviously help you to maintain healthy teeth and gums.

  • Tip #4 – Flossing Daily: Brushing doesn’t always remove unwanted debris that gets stuck between your teeth - which is why you need to floss at least once per day. 
  • Tip #5 – Regular Dental Checkups: Don’t skip those routine dental checkups with a good biological dentist.  Generally speaking, it's recommended to do a dental checkup and cleaning every 6 - 12 months.  But, some people may need checkups more often - especially if gum disease is present. 
Remember, healthy teeth and gums is not just about a "pretty smile."  It’s all about keeping your immune system strong and avoiding future health problems.  


Sources for this article include: 

CDC.gov

NaturalHealth365.com

MedicalNewsToday.com

NIH.gov

NIH.gov